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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 31, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. a brexit warning from the bank of england. it's predicting as many as 75,000 financial services jobs could be lost if britain leaves the eu without a new trade deal. good morning, it's tuesday 31st october. the defence secretary sir michael fallon says he apologised to a journalist after putting his hand on her knee when they had dinner together. facebook reveals that more than 100 million americans may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, around the time of the us election. in sport, mo heads home. after six years based in the united states, farah the four time olympic champion says he's missing london and wants his children to grow up in the uk.
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and carol has the weather. good morning, a much milder stuff and most of this yesterday but much cloudier run with rain in the north and the west. dry and bright with some sunshine later on. more details on 15 minutes. the bank of england has predicted that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. senior figures at the bank have also warned financial firms to prepare to lose their right to trade across the eu. 0ur economics editor kamal ahmed reports. it will be one of the toughest challenges facing the brexit negotiators, i'm tackling the multitrillion pound financial services industry which links the uk with the rest of the european union. banks and financial companies based
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in britain pay £67 billion in taxes each year and contribute a trade surplus of £58 billion helping the uk's economy. many eu countries would like a slice of the sector and see brexit as an opportunity. frankfurt and paris for example are marketing themselves as new places to locate. the bank of england is now preparing for tens of thousands ofjob now preparing for tens of thousands of job losses now preparing for tens of thousands ofjob losses which it believes will hit the uk if there is no new free—trade deal. some will simply disappear as the financial sector shrinks across britain and some will be loss —— lost to london's competitor cities. although the bank believes the job losses is a reasonable scenario over 3—5 years, many are optimistic that a good deal will be signed on financial services because both the uk and the eu will not want to disrupt such a buyer —— such a vital component of the economy and even with the job losses, britain, with over1 million financial services jobs, will still
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be by far the most important centre for banking in europe. the defence secretary has said he apologised for putting his hand near the journalist during a dinner. apologised for putting his hand near thejournalist during a dinner. this was some time ago. why has it come to light? this was back in 2002. 15 yea rs to light? this was back in 2002. 15 years ago. there is a huge amount speculation and dredging over previous incidents going on at westminster at the moment and there has been a distinct lack of specifics but this is very much specific, albeit one that is talked down on pretty much dismissed by both sides. let's take a look at the front page of the sun. this is
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michael fallon acknowledging he had dinner at the conservative party conference and was sitting next to julia hartley—brewer who was then a political journalist and is julia hartley—brewer who was then a politicaljournalist and is now a radio presenter. he had put his hand on to her knee. he now acknowledges that was overstepping the mark. let us that was overstepping the mark. let us take a look atjulia ha rtley— brewer's us take a look atjulia hartley—brewer's recollection of what happened. indeed, what she makes of it. an incident which sir michael acknowledges was appropriate and julia hartley—brewer is trying to talk down the significance of that are specific and a swirl of allegations which up to now has been dominated by anonymous accounts without much detail attached to them. if i can pick without much detail attached to them. ifi can pick up without much detail attached to them. if i can pick up what was going on in parliament, long discussions about what they are going to do it, for example, something is reported. this is the ci’ux something is reported. this is the crux of all this. parliament asking itself pretty deep and awkward questions about its own procedures and its own culture and the culture
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is really important here because he have a bunch of 650 mps, most of whom are spending several months a week away from home, involved in late—night votes were alcohol might be involved and there is a big power relationship between lots of mps who are men and lots of commons staff who are not. that is the scenario westminster finds itself in. who are not. that is the scenario westminsterfinds itself in. coupled with rules that make it difficult foran mp with rules that make it difficult for an mp researcher to complain to their employer because the mp is the employer. it's that kind of rule change in procedure change that is now being discussed. at the committee like the commons commission discussed this after the debate that we saw in the chamber yesterday afternoon. westminster, like a good number of other institutions, doing a lot of soul—searching about how it grapples with this and takes this moment to change the rules that they operate under. thank you.
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gambling machine investigation considered by the government. campaigners want the maximum bet reduced to just £2 but bookmakers argue it would result in half of all betting shops closing. jim connolly has more. a few months ago, nathan would have struggled to walk past a bookmaker. this says fixed odds machines started his problem and he stopped betting with the help of gamblers anonymous. i could just betting with the help of gamblers anonymous. i couldjust not betting with the help of gamblers anonymous. i could just not help myself at all. lost over 5000 gallons in a 40— over —— 40— hour period. you lose all sense of time. the money becomes a number on the screen and you are desensitised to
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everything that is going on. gamblers anonymous was my last resort. currently, you can bet up to £100 a time on a fixed odds betting terminal. the government review is suggesting lower limits. last year, £1.8 billion was made from these types of machines. the association of british bookmakers say the meeting the amount you can bet each time could mean half of all betting shops would clothes —— would close and 21,000 people might lose their jobs. this part of east london has more than its fair share of bookmakers. legally, shops like this one are restricted to having only for fixed odds machines one are restricted to having only forfixed odds machines in each shop and some critics say they are so profitable, that some companies have multiple branches all in the same area. the gambling industry has 12 weeks to respond before the government decides how low it is limit will be. facebook says 126—million americans
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may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, during the last two years. it comes as president trump's former campaign manager, paul manafort, faces charges as part of an inquiry into allegations that russia interfered with the presidential election. from washington, our north america correspondent, laura bicker reports. paul manafort, donald trump's former campaign manager, leaves court under house arrest facing 12 grave charges including money laundering and conspiracy, pleading not guilty and the charges don't relate to his work with a trump campaign but as he sped away from the spotlight, there came an unexpected bombshell. george papadopoulos, and unpaid adviserfor the campaign, pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi about his russian contacts. his charge sheet says while he was a trump at met a
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russian professor in london who said he had dirt on hillary clinton. despite having told the fbi he wasn't a member of the campaign when the meeting took place. the professor said he had thousands of clinton campaign emails and he worked to set up a meeting between trump and vladimir putin which didn't happen. he discloses facts of communication between the trump campaign and russia and that could bea campaign and russia and that could be a much bigger problem for trump. meanwhile more details have emerged of alleged rushing attempts to influence voters on social media. facebook believes 126 american users may have come into contact with russian backed propaganda during the election. this investigation is not going away as the white house had hoped and could overshadow the trump presidency for some time to come. stormont parties have been given another day to resolve 10—month deadlock over the restoration of power—sharing.
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the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, said the democratic unionists and sinn fein had made progress, but added that they'd made additional requests which needed to be considered by the government. today marks 500 years since the beginning of the protestant reformation. it was the moment german monk, martin luther, is said to have nailed a list of 95 criticisms to the doors of a church in wittenberg to the south of berlin. his actions divided the catholic church and wars were fought in the name of religion. 0ur religious affairs correspondent martin bashir reports. in the provincial town of wittenberg, 60 miles south of berlin, all the souvenirs are in a row as they prepare to mark today's anniversary. in the church where he preached, luther, who nailed his 95 criticisms to the doors of the university chapel, is pictured in disguise alongside the disciples. the german monk‘s objections began with his anger over indulgences, giving money to the church in the hope of being fast—tracked through purgatory.
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his actions provoked a doctrinal earthquake that spread throughout europe with churches rejecting the authority of the pope. martin luther's impact went well beyond the church and well beyond germany. and today, here in wittenberg, chancellor angela merkel and the german president willjoin a special service to mark 500 years since the start of the reformation. and in westminster abbey, a special service of reconciliation will take place at lunchtime when the archbishop of canterbury will present copies of a text aboutjustification by faith alone — the doctrine that split the church 500 years ago to catholic, lutheran and methodist church leaders. martin bashir, bbc news. police helicopters with thermal imaging cameras are being used
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in the hunt for a missing lynx. the eurasian lynx, about twice the size of a domestic cat, escaped from borth wild animal kingdom, near aberystwyth. the park has been closed as staff try to find the animal. police say it poses no general danger to the public but have urged people not to approach the cat if they spot it. they are still on the lookout. there will be sightings the years. babies and all the rest of it. did you say missing lynx? i was trying to ignore it. well done. good morning. how are we doing? mo farah is coming home. the hugely successful period in his career. ten global titles. he spent the summer back and he just feels
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that it's the perfect time to him to bring his family back home. is missing london. it brings to an end his six year relationship with his coach alberto salazar, who remains under investigation by the us anti doping agency, after allegations of drug use at his training base. he denies any wrong doing and farah says he's never had any reason to doubt him. linked with a switch to everton — sean dyche said he's just getting on with his currentjob with burnley, and it's working. a 1—nil win over newcastle last night moved them up to seventh — dyche celebrating his 5 year anniversary at the club. england's under—17's have returned home from india, following their world cup triumph over spain in what's been a period of success for the youth teams. lots of people wondering if that will translate to the senior side. and former world snooker champion stuart bingham wont appeal against his six month ban for breaching betting rules but says he's sorry for what he's done, and denies placing bets on any matches he was playing in. so there we are. that is sport. see
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with a bit later. it didn't feel so cold out that carol will have the proper details for you. good morning. that is absolutely right. in parts of scotland, a good 15 degrees warmer than it was. we don't have the widespread frost. we have quite a bit of cloud, particularly in the north. here, it is that bit colder. as we go through the course of today, what you find is in the northern half of the country, there will be a lot of cloud around. the heaviest, most persistent rain will be in the west highlands. some murky conditions across parts of northern england. a lot of cloud here as it is in northern ireland. as become south into wales and southern england and the midlands, east anglia, down towards kent, there are some brighter breaks expected
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through the course of the morning. variable amounts of cloud. through the course of the day, we hang on to this rain. breezy in the northern half of the country. showers coming across parts of northern england and across parts of northern england and a few into wales, the midlands and east anglia but there are showers at the many of us we will miss them all together. some brighter conditions. we could reach that in the short of the pennines. heading on through the evening and if you are out trick—or—treating it will still be mild. there is still rain across the north and as we go through tonight you will find that we hang onto that rain across ireland and parts of scotland, across this central belt. it will be a wet start to the day for you tomorrow. further south you will be sunny under the brakes and like the nightjust gone it will
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fill chilly to the here is that band of rain still with us across northern ireland and scotland. it syncs at south and will bring some showers and to get to push ahead of that band of rain we look at a lot of dry and bright weather, again with sunshine and temperatures responding accordingly. they are good temperatures that this time of year, average, just above. 15 in london. moving from wednesday into thursday here is our weather front sinking southwards. it is a weak feature and it will bring aid band of cloud with a couple of spots of rain. behind it some dry and bright conditions with some sunshine coming through. ahead of that, along the far south, they have the brightest conditions but the temperature will come down again. this is nine across scotla nd come down again. this is nine across scotland and northern england. a little higher than that as we pushed down to the south. the weekend is looking cooler with more showers.
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down to the south. the weekend is looking cooler with more showerslj love looking cooler with more showers.” love those ghosts. the others did not see them, carol. you do need to be quick. excellent. we will look out for them later. do you think i was the only person who saw them? i promise you, there were about four ghosts on the map. we will have a look through the papers shortly and a story about kevin spacey is across many front pages this morning. the us streaming service, netflix, has announced it will not commission another series of the political drama, ‘house of cards‘. the move comes after the programme's lead actor, kevin spacey, was accused of sexually harrassing the actor anthony rapp when he was 1a years old in 1986. the company has said it is "deeply troubled" by the allegation and mr spacey has apologised for any "inappropriate drunken behaviour". joining us now from los angeles is our north america correspondent, peter bowes. good morning. can you tell us about
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netflix... good morning. can you tell us about netflix. .. what exactly good morning. can you tell us about netflix... what exactly is happening with the future of the programme? they are making the sixth easy and right now. it is due to start streaming next year. what they have said is that they will not be making any more series after that one. they are pointing out that they made this decision several months ago, implying that it has not been directly affected by the news that we have heard about kevin spacey over the last 2a hours. they did release that strongly worded statement saying that they were deeply troubled by the allegations against kevin spacey who, of course, is the star of the show. a big reason why it has been so successful. he gave a statement yesterday. has there been more reaction from hollywood? yes. there has been a lot of reaction. the reaction really focused on the nature of the statement that he gave. he did apologise, although he said he could not actually remember
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being counted. but he said that if it were true you deeply regretted the inappropriate drunken behaviour. then he went on to effectively come out, to say that he was gay, in a statement. it is the fact that he did that at the same time as this apology that has annoyed people. some sort of implication, almost an excuse, for his behaviour, although he did not freeze it like that. it seemed odd to people that he would choose this moment in time to come out. that in itself is no great surprise to a lot of people, many of whom, his close friends and collea g u es whom, his close friends and colleagues have known this prolonged time. but the fact that he should ta ke time. but the fact that he should take this opportunity has really angered people. people say that bad behaviour is babe bad behaviour no matter what your sexuality. —— had behaviour is bad behaviour. kevin spacey behaviour is bad behaviour. kevin s pa cey yes behaviour is bad behaviour. kevin spacey yes on a lot of front pages. and some clarification here about
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house of cards. that story is making the front pages, there are a few saying that the show has been cancelled. the other story you can see is more about westminster and the sex scandal, that it could be worse than expenses as the enquiries continue. looking at the front page of the mail, a story that we will be discussing shortly hear about toxic air. the way they have written it up is that people in nearly every part of the uk have pollution levels so high they breach global safety limits. we will be discussing that through the programme. london, glasgow, leads and birmingham are rated as heavily polluted in this study backed by 26 different groups including the royal college of physicians. the guardian is picking up physicians. the guardian is picking up on physicians. the guardian is picking up on some physicians. the guardian is picking up on some of the disclosures yesterday affecting donald trump. those members of his organisation who are linked to some of those
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enquiries on the front page of the daily mail newspaper, the pride of britain awards. paying tribute to some of the grenfell tower... always a terrific occasion. stories that emerged of heroism and it is a great night. such bravery and car it -- courage. john, what do you have for us? a great picture here, a return of the notorious under 17 's after winning the world cup. the golden boot winner, eight goals in total. what do you do as a world cup winner returning to your hometown? apparently popout for a pint of milk. there he is. no—one knows who he is. walking across a street in his hometown with his world cup win a medal around his neck. it is one of those questions like you get asked from an interviewer, if he is asked from an interviewer, if he is asked how much of hindmilk costs, he will now. what a great picture. do
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you have anything else for us? another one, i suppose. talking about the success that they are having. marcus here. this time i am of how successful his career has been. talking about somebody to inspire too, look at the impact he has made on the senior side. who scored on his international debut, in his england debut and his potential could now help england win a world cup in russia next year. so look at this guy when you think about the under 17 is going to be senior. did you say he is going to win, that england is going to win the world cup? i am not saying that. did not put that only. you just said that he could, right? 23 minutes past six. seven years ago, huge flames engulfed hastings pier in a devastating fire that almost destroyed it. the aftermath of the blaze saw the local community come together in an effort to rebuild the 19th century structure. its replacement — which opened to the public last year — is now the front runner
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for the biggest award in british architecture, the riba stirling prize. 0ur arts correspondent, david sillito, has been to meet the people who helped turn a disaster into a triumph. it gets you in here. you just think why? you were here when it burnt down? i was. people why? you were here when it burnt down? iwas. people thati why? you were here when it burnt down? iwas. people that i had why? you were here when it burnt down? i was. people that i had never spoken to before were stopping me to talk about the peer and everyone was devastated. it was really quite upsetting. that massive fire and it felt like, you did not know how was going to come back. did you think it was all over them? i did and a lot of people did. colour was the opposite. —— but it was the
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opposite. —— but it was the opposite. seven years after the fire, the peer has been rebuild —— reborn. the local community now owns the peer and it has been rebuilt. this curtain of glass finally gives the people of hastings a panoramic views out to sea. the woodwork here, it is the original timber from the peer —— pier. there are still scorch marks from the fire. but the most important innovation is this... nothing! what they chose not to build. the empty space. there is no end of the pier. and there is a good reason for all this space. the history of britain's peers is a story of recurring disaster. flimsy wooden attractions that have a habit of going bankrupt and burning down. so much to listen to, so much to
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see. and everything must be the finest in the world, even the potato peel finest in the world, even the potato peel. the old seaside attractions have gone. in their place... 0pen space that can be used for a variety of moneymaking enterprises. the victorians had this great concept of walking over the sea, promenade in, and thanks to them we have this madness in our society of piers around the outside of the post. this man is an engineer. 3000 tons of new steel have been added to try to keep the elements at bay. it is a triumph of hope over reality, isn't it? yes. and that is the biggest challenge. how does this peer fund its own maintenance. how does this pier fund its own maintenance. nonetheless, it was in the running now for building of the year. whatever happens, for
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the residents who helped save it, this is the prize they really wanted. what do you think looking out on this now? i love it. it is so peaceful. peaceful and it does look truly stunning, doesn't it. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. from brexit to bacon — steph‘s in yorkshire to investigate the impact leaving the eu could have on our food industry. i know she was looking for her wellingtons, let us hope she found them should it that morning. good morning. ifound them should it that morning. good morning. i found them and them should it that morning. good morning. ifound them and ifound the pigs as well. we are talking about what impact brexit could have on food production. you can see here that i am surrounded by lots of female pigs who have already had one lot of piglet and now these girls are all pregnant again. they have about 117,000 piglets born here every single year. we don't actually produce enough pigs for the food
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that we need in this country must we importa that we need in this country must we import a lot of pork products as well. i will be looking at what impact brexit will have on that. i have been to denmark to do it so i will tell you about that later on. first, time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. an increase in international visitors over the last quarter and continuing jobs growth show london's economy remains strong. that's according to one of the city's leading think tanks. despite recent terror attacks and continued economic uncertainty following the vote to leave the eu, the centre for london's quarterly review showed the capital is showing resilience. however they do warn a stagnant property market and a drop in migration from eastern europe suggests there is continuing uncertainty. lunchtime meal deals in supermarkets and high street shops are packed with as many as 30 teaspoons of sugar, according to a group of london academics. action on sugar, based at queen mary university of london, found certain drink and food combinations have more than four times the recommended daily sugar intake for adults. it's calling for all high sugar
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drinks and confectionery to be excluded from popular meal deal promotions. the luton based airline, easyjet, has told a commons committee it has no contingency plan for brexit. it follows news the airline has agreed to take over failed carrier air berlin. the deal worth around £35 million includes landing slots and plane leases. last night, the uk director of easyjet told the transport select committee there was no need for a contingency plan despite uncertainty around brexit. we are adding more planes in the uk this year and next year and that is our view. we will not have a contingency plan because we feel there is enough time between now and next autumn to get the bones of an agreement in place and have enough certainty of what we will be operating in four april 2019. there is plenty of time frustrated at. a good service on the tube at the moment as you can see that. on the
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roads the 823, brixton road, it is closed southbound between 0val in bricks and for repairs to a gas leak. uxbridge road is closed near to shepherds bush market after a building fire. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a grey and cloudy start this morning but it is feeling less cold than it did this time yesterday. the cloud eventually should start to thin and we will see some brighter spells. the breeze is slightly stronger than yesterday. still fairly light, however, coming from the south—west it has introduced milder air so it will not feel as chilly. bright spells this afternoon and temperatures reaching 14. afternoon and temperatures reaching 1a. 0vernight tonight the cloud will start to disappear so we will get some clear spells. that could lead to one or two mist patches developing by dawn as the wind remains like. reasonably mild, the minimum temperature somewhere between eight and 10 celsius. for wednesday it looks like a brighter
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day with more sunshine. in fact it feel quite pleasant. the breeze is gentle and coming from the south and in the sunshine could feel quite warm. temperatures reaching 1a, possibly 15 celsius. for thursday, this cold front will gradually start to think south and that will introduce some more cloud. a great day as we head through thursday. it should in most parts they dry. you should in most parts they dry. you should get a spot or two of rain. as we head into the weekend, things will turn a little more uncertain, particularly overnight friday into saturday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. it's 6:31. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: with bookmakers braced for tougher restrictions over fixed—odds betting terminals, we'll meet the bereaved father of a gambling addict to hear why he wants the law changed. millions of us live in places
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where the air is too dangerous to breath — we'll look at where is worst affected. it mightjust surprise you. and if that doesn't give you a fright, perhaps this will. we'll be discussing the scary lengths some people go to to create the perfect halloween look. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the bank of england has predicted that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector — if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. it's warned firms to prepare to lose their right to trade across the eu although senior figures at the bank say they're optimistic of a deal. around 1 million people currently work in the finance sector across the uk. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has confirmed he was once rebuked by a political journalist for putting his hand on her knee during dinner at a party conference in 2002. the radio presenter, julia hartley brewer,
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said she did not consider herself to be a victim of sexual harassment by mr fallon, but urged others who felt they had been assaulted to come forward. it comes as mps review procedures for reporting accusations of sexual harassment at westminster. the us streaming service, netflix, has announced it will not commission another series of the political drama house of cards. the move comes after the programme's lead actor, kevin spacey, was accused of sexually harrassing the actor anthony rapp when he was 1a years old in 1986. the company has said it is "deeply troubled" by the allegation and mr spacey has apologised for any "inappropriate drunken behaviour". a government review into gambling machines is expected to propose tougher restrictions for fixed—odds betting terminals. the machines — which allow people to bet stakes of £100 every 20 seconds — have been described as the "crack cocaine" of gambling. campaigners are calling for the maximum bet to be reduced
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tojust £2. but bookmakers say that would lead to half of all betting shops closing and result in 21,000 job losses. john is back and he is talking about mo farah returning to the uk.” think he spent the summer here with his family. he realised how much he misses london. he has decided would be good. a long period of success. ten global titles he won. it brings to an end his six year relationship with his coach alberto salazar, who remains under investigation by the us anti doping agency, after allegations of drug use at his training base. he denies any wrong doing and farah
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says he's never had any reason to doubt him. i want to thank each member of the project and alberto thought is done over the years. i am coming back and my new coach will be gavin lok sign excited to start a new project, and i can't wait to be back home and see my team at arsenal and emirates. he's been linked with everton but sean dyche says he's just concentrating on his currentjob — and it's working. burnley are up to 7th in the premier league after beating newcastle one nil, jeff hendrick with the goal, as their manager marked five years in charge. it's a way that i found works with a tea m it's a way that i found works with a team and is appropriate because the next game is the most important game. it's a sprint, we made a good start. watford captain troy deeney has been charged with violent conduct after he appeared to grab stoke's joe allen by the face towards the end of their match on saturday. deeney apparently reacted angrily
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when allen accused him of acting outside the sprit of the game, afer a player went down injured. england's under—17's have returned from india following their world cup triumph. they came from 2—nil down in the final to beat spain 5—2 on saturday. with the under 20's winning their wrold cup and the under 19s becoming european champions, it's been a hugely successful year. but what does it mean for the future of the england national side? the england team is the purist youth development. you can't sign a form player to get in the way. satellites so important overall here at george's park. they all mixing, you can move them between teams. sitting with the first team, he can look at all the teams and look at getting progress reports from all the coaches and it will be a point of
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oh, yeah, this one is good enough. it's a big night ahead in the champions league, with manchester united, chelsea and celtic all in action. lots of build—up on the bbc sport website. allegations of cheating in paralympic sport will be examined by a parliamentary committee this morning. mps will discuss the classification of athletes after a bbc investigation uncovered claims of tactics being used to cheat the system, taping up of arms and even surgery system, taping up of arms and even surgery to shortened limbs. paralympic figures will be asked about the culture in our sports. i don't subscribe to the view that there is a fundamental weakness about sport classification, i don't subscribe to the view that it's absolutely perfect either. i think actually it's a very sophisticated pa rt actually it's a very sophisticated part of paralympic sport that is getting better, that's getting more understood and fundamentally does work to support the athletes to
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compete and win fairly. former world snooker champion stuart bingham has decided not to appeal against his six month ban for breaching betting rules. the ban was suspended for 3 months and a day, which means he'll return to the game after the masters next year. ronnie 0'sullivan was thrashed 6—1 by a 17—year—old at the international open in china. the five—time world champion struggled against the sharply dressed world number 53, yan bingtao. 0'sullivan didn't pot a ball in the last four frames of the match. he later said that only stephen hendry and john higgins have played that well against him before. it isa it is a nice waistcoat. i wonder what ronnie 0'sullivan was wearing. he has been playing in trainers because of a sore rankle. he probably needs some sort of smart shoes. i think it was black trousers he was wearing. do they match? i
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think it was a red waistcoat, web trousers. maybe that is the key to success. trousers. maybe that is the key to success. i could see when something similar, c. you would match well with the sofa. let'sjust not going to happen. stop that one straightaway. they love the way you think. you might think that a trip to the seaside brings with it the benefits of fresh air. but according to a new report, that isn't necessarily the case. research suggests millions of people, in 44 towns around the uk are living in areas where the air is so polluted it's considered by the world health organisation to be too dangerous for us to breathe. researchers measured the amount of tiny soot—like particles in the air, which can lead to heart disease and premature death. the safe limit is 10 micrograms per cubic metre. but the study found london to have an average of 15. glasgow's air quality was even worse though. while the pollution levels of birmingham, cardiff and manchester weren't far behind. and you may be surpised to hear that in the seaside town
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of eastbourne, researchers found 15 micrograms per cubic metre of air — meaning it was as polluted as london according to this measure. nick watts is the executive director of the lancet countdown on health and climate change, which co—ordinated the research. thank you for your time this morning. people would have seen some of those results. some would assume them to be the case. do you want to ta ke them to be the case. do you want to take us through the overview of what you found ? take us through the overview of what you found? absolutely, and thank you to having me on today. you are entirely right. the results were quite shocking. the royal college of physicians has made clear across the country, 40,000 people, the equivalent of 40,000 deaths every year at equivalent of 40,000 deaths every yearat —— equivalent of 40,000 deaths every year at —— occur because of vision. the report we put out today put that in contrast and says these debts are
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just occurring in london where you might think the pollution is bad. 44 cities around the country out of the 50 that we looked at exceeded safe limits by the world health 0rganization limits by the world health organization and that is surprising but what is even more surprising is one of the report's key conclusions which is the sources of air pollution that are harming our hearts and lungs directly are also the same sources as climate change which is harming help directly in a whole host of other ways. talk this through this figure. the 15 micrograms per cubic metre, the level you saw in london but at eastbourne, which people might be surprised about. if you are in eastbourne this morning, what is thatis eastbourne this morning, what is that is a statistic from the measurement, what does that do to you? —— measurement, what does that do to you ? —— what measurement, what does that do to you? —— what does that statistic? measurement, what does that do to you? -- what does that statistic? we see the vast majority of the health impact ofair see the vast majority of the health impact of air pollution comes in the
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form of ischaemic heart disease, heart disease. a third of it in respiratory disorders like asthma, making matters worse, chronic lung disease, excess that —— exacerbating chronic respiratory system —— symptoms. people experience pollution differently. take us through some of the science. these particles, they associated with diesel cars per example. why would a place like eastbourne, by the seaside, be so badly affected? the science on this is fairly complex but there are a whole range of reasons why air pollution might be bad in one particular city. in the case of eastbourne, the geography, it falls directly in a belt across the united kingdom where our pollution is particularly bad. some of the pollution people experience is originating from places outside of eastbourne. some of the polluting
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cities across europe and further north of the uk. the government as you well know is cracking down on diesel cars and a number of measures that over the longer term, they are banning them entirely by 2040. what measures are available that could change things to any great bore lesser degree? that the exciting news that comes out. there are some simple cost—effective solutions that the government can be put in place which will help some obtaining as the tackle climate change, air pollution, improve public health —— health and save the nhs billions of pounds. this could be the phase—out of coal fired power, pounds. this could be the phase—out of coalfired power, a dirty polluting form of energy, transitioning to renewable energy like solar and wind power. the phase—out of diesel cars as you suggested and the government should be commended on some of the work
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it's been doing but the point is, these are just sensible cost—effective interventions that any doctor worth his or her salt would suggest we are doing more so if there are health benefits, why aren't we doing more? doctor, thank you very much of your time. that report detailing the difference is across the uk. as you say, surprising. breakfast on bbc news. the bank of england is predicting tens of thousands ofjob losses no post— brexit trade deal on finances agreed with the eu. netflix has announced it is dropping house of cards days after kevin spacey was accused of sexually harassing a teenage boy. stepping up this morning it is not as cold as it was yesterday for most of us. in southern england there are breaks in the cloud to begin exeter at the moment it is only two celsius but generally much milder than yesterday.
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that he will hang on through the day. also, there is a fair bit of cloud around as well. as we go through the morning we hang on to the cloud. england and the rest wales is cloud to start the morning and where the cloud has broken overnight that is where we see the lowest temperatures. generally speaking, thatis temperatures. generally speaking, that is in the southern areas. through the course of today what you see is that rain will persist across the west highlands. some of the getting over to the east of scotland. that will be patchy nature and we will see some showers coming across northern ireland and a few reaching northern england, a couple in wales, in and east anglia. though showers, they are the exception rather than the rule. by the south the cloud will break and there will be sunshine to begin that sunshine we will see highs of 14 self years in the shelter of the pennines of the grampians we could see highs between 12 and 14 as well. living on through the evening and overnight you will see my friends and just a second if you are out trick in treating. it will be a mild night, cloudy and it will be wet across northern ireland and scotland in a
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tickly once again the west highlands. that sinks south into the central lowlands as we go through of the night. first thing tomorrow, it will be a wet start across northern ireland and the central lowlands. in the north of the country, it is still mild and fresh as we push south. a band of rain tomorrow, and the breezy day. that band of rain narrows as we go through the course of the day across southern counties of the day across southern counties of scotland. it fizzles out across northern ireland. writes guys come in from the north with showers. ahead of the rain it is a bad day, actually. —— not a bad day. it will fill pleasant for the time of year with highs reaching 15. on wednesday into thursday the weather front produces a narrow band of rain and it sinks south weakening all the time. that will introduce a band of cloud. there will be a few spots of rain on it and ahead of the bright skies for a time. behind it, rain on it and ahead of the bright skies fora time. behind it, much drier and sunnier than we are looking at today. but look at the temperature difference. tomorrow we are coming down, hanging on to them as we pushed out —— push down. thank
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you very much and charlie, did you see the ghosts that time? yes, yes i did. we've been talking about the impact leaving the eu could have on the financial sector this morning, and another industry likely to be significantly affected by brexit is that of food. steph is at a pig farm in east yorkshire for us this morning. good morning to you, step. i am looking forward to seeing what you are up to this morning. good morning. good morning. can see here that pigs are waking up here this pig farm in east yorkshire. these are some of the fowls, these pigs are some of the fowls, these pigs are all currently pregnant at the moment and they are split into different groups depending on how far along they are in their pregnancy. 0ver far along they are in their pregnancy. over the other side you have the pigs who are given birth. be has spent time with their piglets and then they are weaned and they
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end up back on this side of the pitch and. it is a massive industry, the food industry in this country but we don't actually produce enough pork to meet the needs that we require for the demand. we import a lot of. as part of this looking at brexit we are doing a series over the next 17 months until we leave the next 17 months until we leave the eu, we will look at different areas. i have been to denmark, one of the biggest providers of pork to us of the biggest providers of pork to us to find out more about what impact brexit could have. denmark. famous for pastries, lego, butter, beer and bacon. this country has done well with trading with the uk, in particular, selling us poor. 0ne quarter of the pork products we impact —— import into the uk come from denmark and they have been
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exporting it for over 150 years. this farmer is the fifth generation in his family to run this business. 35,000 pigs are born on this farm every year. on our farm we've produced especially for the uk market. most of our production end up market. most of our production end up in the uk. it is an important thing. are you worried about it? we are following what is happening at the moment and we will be trying to find new markets for our product but we hope we can keep treating as we have done for hundreds of years. as we leave the farm we have along miles of the greenland. it is unsurprising that agriculture is big business here. —— miles of flat green land. this factory is the world ‘s largest exporter of pork. at the moment they do not have to pay tariffs when trading with us. that could change when we leave. the only thing we know is uncertainty.
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and as a business we don't like uncertainty. there is a need for imports to the uk and we also think the affinity between us especially with truth will prevail. winnie the uk and we think the uk needs us as well. here they are cutting up pork loin that will be shipped to the uk within the next few days, killed and made into a vacant. for the last 40 yea rs, made into a vacant. for the last 40 years, anything to do with food has been controlled by the eu. from subsidies to safety. here on the west coast, some of the goods leaving here are heading across the north sea to the uk. it is put on lorries here in denmark and will arrive a distribution centres in the uk without facing border checks. even small delays in time can have an effect on some pork regarding trucks. we are sure if we get
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administrative burdens we will be able to sort some of them out with technology that some of our concerns is what will happen in the uk. will your economy slowdown? will the buying power for the your economy slowdown? will the buying powerfor the british people slowdown? they are optimistic either trade with the uk will continue after we leave the eu. alleges clear that they are hoping it will be with a deal that does not change much in what we already have. but —— but it is clear. we have vicki who runs this farm here, and tim from the food and drink federation. wrecks it has a huge opportunity, potentially. the reform will maybe hopefully give us some opportunities. so that's the common agricultural policy? yes. to
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be given incentives to reduce in production —— production so the government will hopefully incentivise and make us more efficient, i suppose. incentivise and make us more efficient, isuppose. there incentivise and make us more efficient, i suppose. there will be money available for new buildings, maybe, investing in new technology and the like which the pig industry has not had at the moment. we need a deal with the eu, however because we do rely heavily on imports and we do not want to be having to import from countries outside the eu who do not have the same standards we do. and how about business for you? you are benefiting from the weaker pound? yes. it has been good for us since brexit, basically. it has made imports into this country very expensive and, so, yeah. our price has been good. are you optimistic? yeah. and what are the thoughts generally from the food industry, because we do rely heavily on imports. this farm is a great example of why british food is so
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great. and vicki is right, we import 40% more food of the year so it is and what we get a great trade deal and what we get a great trade deal and it is and what we know what the like 2019. and it is especially important that we know what the standards will be because high quality and welfare standards is what has made british food so popular. of a very different? there are different approaches to food quality and animal welfare. we need to balance the importance of free trade with those standards. consumers in this country love the quality they get and they do not wa nt quality they get and they do not want the standards to slip. we heard there from vicki about how the weak pound has helped. what has it meant across the industry? we have started to see the first time food prices going up. yes. after a long price -- period of prices going down, they had been going along steadily as a result of the devaluation of the pound. we hope that will slow down our. but as long as there is uncertainty about what will happen with the trade deal and transition
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than food and drink businesses will continue to be concerned. and it is about certainty more than anything else? it is. exactly that. hopefully once the pigs are awake we can talk toa once the pigs are awake we can talk to a bit —— once the pigs are awake we can talk toa bit ——a once the pigs are awake we can talk to a bit —— a bit longer. will show you more around the farm labour. what time do they get fed? at apia —— and in the morning? —— eight in the morning. thank you very much. see you later. through the day you will be able to find out more about the issues regarding food production in a purse brexit written. that happens across the bbc. coming up to seven o'clock. this is breakfast. still to come this morning — it's halloween and if you're dressing up you might be reaching for a white bed sheet to become a ghost or a bin—bag to fashion into a witch's dress. but it seems many of us are going to increasingly scary lengths to get the perfect look. later in the programme, we'll be joined by a makeup artist to get some tips on the best
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way to look your worst. look at these intricate facepainting is. here's some of her work but we want to see your efforts too. some of you are already sending in pictures. thank you very much indeed. i would like to see some rubbish ones. that does not surprise me. not everyone can do that. no. because that takes enormous skill and many hours. but, whatever the pictures, please send them to us. we would like to see. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. ambulance crews and police officers will routinely be dispatched to passengers in cardiac arrest in and of in passengers in cardiac arrest in and ofina passengers in cardiac arrest in and of in a bid to boost survival rates
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across the capital. in london, the average cardiac survival rate is 9%. at heathrow, the rate is 75% it was there so many defibrillators available, and stuffy know how to use them. to replicate the success elsewhere, police officers carrying the life—saving equipment will patients until paramedics arrived. lunchtime meal deals in supermarkets and high street shops are packed with as many as 30 teaspoons of sugar, according to a group of london academics. action on sugar, based at queen mary university of london, found certain drink and food combinations have more than four times the recommended daily sugar intake for adults. it's calling for all high sugar drinks and confectionery to be excluded from popular meal deal promotions. the luton based airline, easyjet, has told a commons committee it has no contingency plan for brexit. it follows news the airline has agreed to take over failed carrier air berlin. the deal worth around £35 million includes landing slots and plane leases. last night, the uk director of easyjet told the transport select committee there was no need for a contingency plan despite uncertainty around brexit. we are adding more planes in the uk this year and next year and that is our view.
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we will not have a contingency plan because we feel there is enough time between now and next autumn to get the bones of an agreement in place and have enough certainty of what we will be operating in for april 2019. there is plenty of time for us to get it right. a good service on the tube at the moment as you can see that. the m4 is now blocked out of town. the m4 is now blocked out of town. the queues have reached back to the a4. annex to houston station, astrid is still closed for repairs to the water main. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a grey and cloudy start this morning but it is feeling less cold than it did this time yesterday. the cloud eventually should start to thin and we will see some brighter spells. the breeze is slightly stronger than yesterday. still fairly light, however, coming from the south—west it has introduced milder air so it will not feel as chilly. bright spells this afternoon and temperatures reaching
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14. 0vernight tonight the cloud will start to disappear so we will get some clear spells. that could lead to one or two mist patches developing by dawn as the wind remains light. reasonably mild, the minimum temperature somewhere between eight and 10 celsius. for wednesday it looks like a brighter day with more sunshine. in fact it feels quite pleasant. the breeze is gentle and coming from the south and in the sunshine could feel quite warm. temperatures reaching 14, possibly 15 celsius. for thursday, this cold front will gradually start to sink south and that will introduce some more cloud. a great day as we head through thursday. it should in most parts they dry. you should get a spot or two of rain. as we head into the weekend, things will turn a little more uncertain, particularly overnight friday into saturday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast,
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with louise minchin and charlie stayt. a brexit warning from the bank of england. it's predicting as many as 75,000 financial services jobs could be lost if britain leaves the eu without a new trade deal. good morning, it's tuesday 31st october. also this morning: a crackdown on high stakes betting machines. the government proposes new limits on the amounts that can be gambled. the defence secretary sir michael fallon says he apologised to a journalist after putting his hand on her knee when they had dinner together. facebook reveals that more than 100 million americans may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, around the time of the us election.
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good morning from this pig farm in east yorkshire were on looking at what impact brexit could have on food production. in sport, mo heads home. after six years based in the united states, farah the four time 0lympic champion says he's missing london and wants his children to grow up in the uk carol has the weather. good morning. the cloudy start of the day to most of us that much milder than yesterday. some rain across the northern half of the country. highs up northern half of the country. highs up to 14 or15 northern half of the country. highs up to 14 or 15 degrees. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. first, our main story. the bank of england has predicted that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. senior figures at the bank have also warned financial firms to prepare to lose their right
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to trade across the eu. 0ur economics editor kamal ahmed reports. it will be one of the toughest challenges facing the brexit negotiators, untangling the multitrillion—pound financial services industry that links the uk with the rest of the european union. banks and financial companies based in britain pay £67 billion in taxes each year and contribute a trade surplus of £58 billion, helping the uk's economy. many eu countries would like a slice of the sector and see brexit as an opportunity. frankfurt and paris, for example, are marketing themselves the bank of england is now preparing for tens of thousands ofjob losses which it believes will hit the uk if there is no new free—trade deal. some will simply disappear as the financial sector shrinks across britain and some will be lost to london's competitor cities. although the bank believes the 75,000 job losses is a reasonable scenario over 3—5 years, many are optimistic that a good deal will be signed
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on financial services because both the uk and the eu will not want to disrupt such a vital component of the continent's economy and even with the job losses, britain, with over1 million financial servicesjobs, will still be by far the most important centre for banking in europe. the defence secretary sir michael fallon has confirmed that he apologised to the journalist julia hartley—brewer after putting his hand on her knee during a dinner together in 2002. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, joins us now from westminster. this is an incident that happened over 15 years ago, isn't it? it dates back to 2002 and it is an allegation in the swirling soup of
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allegations and don'ts, —— anecdotes, much of which are anonymous, a lot of black penrith acting key information on names. both protagonists are talking about it. sir michael fallon at the conservative conference in 2002 were sitting next to julia hartley—brewer, then a political journalist and now radio presenter in which they accept that he put his hand on to her knee. he acknowledges that he overstepped the mark but what is striking is that both parties are trying to talk down the significance of this. i will show you a statement thatjulia ha rtley— brewer you a statement thatjulia hartley—brewer has put on social media overnight. asi as i say, this, specific instance that we now have details of with both sides tried to talk down its significance. in a way, it is interesting looking at the wording ofjulia interesting looking at the wording of julia hartley—brewer's statement. that shows the difficulty
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westminster faces making sure they deal with things in the right category, that they are treated correctly as to how the victim feels what happens. there is an overlap between the soul—searching happening here at westminster and the questions being asked in other institutions, whether it be in hollywood or elsewhere. harvey weinstein. where it is different at westminster is if you like the working practices which are a bit awed. mps acknowledged that, in a statement and questions yesterday, 650 people working late at night, a way from home, often with alcohol involved and most of those in power are men and lots of the common staff are men and lots of the common staff are women. that is the cultural oddity of westminster stories are emerging out of. coupled with the
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rules and regulations which are being looked at in some detail, not least the situation where, up to now, if an assistant in the house of commons is wanted to complain, the first port of call into the mp they work for get that mp to be the very person they are wanting to complain about. westminster at the moment taking a good laugh ——a good look at its regulations and procedures to see what it can do to make it easy in the future for alleged victims to come forward and seek redress for what has happened. a government review into gambling machines is expected to propose tougher restrictions for fixed—odds betting terminals. the machines have been described as the "crack cocaine" of gambling, because they're highly addictive and allow people to bet stakes of £100 every 20 seconds. campaigners want the maximum bet reduced to just £2
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but bookmakers argue that would result in half of all betting shops closing and 21,000 job losses. a few months ago, nathan would have struggled to walk past a bookmakers. his excessive gambling problem started with fixed odds machines. he stopped betting with help from gamblers anonymous. i found myself suddenly with debts i could not cover. i lost about £5,000 in 48 hours. you lose all sense of time around you. the moneyjust, the money isjust a number on a screen. you're desensitised to everything that is going on. gamblers anonymous was my final resort to save relationships. you can bet up to £100 a time on a fixed odds terminal. the government review suggests a much lower limit, making these machines less attractive. last year, £1.8 billion was made from these types of machines. the association of british bookmakers says limiting the amount you bet each time could mean that half of all betting shops would close and 21,000 people may lose
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theirjobs. just like high streets, up and down the country, this part of east london has more than its fair share of bookmakers. legally, shops like this one are restricted to having only four machines in each shops. some critics say they are so profitable that some companies have multiple branches in the same area. the gambling industry has 12 weeks to respond before the government decides how low its limit will be. facebook says 126 million americans may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, during the last two years. it comes as president trump's former campaign manager, paul manafort, faces charges as part of an inquiry into allegations that russia interfered with the presidential election. from washington, our north america correspondent, laura bicker reports. paul manafort, donald trump's former campaign manager leaves court under house arrest faceing 12 grave charges including money laundering and conspiracy.
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he's pleading not guilty and the charges don't relate to his work with the trump campaign. but as he sped away from the spotlight, there came an unexpected bombshell. george papadopoulos, an unpaid foreign policy adviser for the trump campaign secretly pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi about his russian contacts. his charge sheet says that while he was an aide he met a russian professor in london who said he had dirt on hillary clinton. despite having earlier told the fbi he wasn't a member of the trump campaign when the meeting took place. the professor claimed he had thousands of clinton campaign emails and he worked to arrange a meeting between vladimir putin and donald trump, something that did not happen. papadopoulos's guilty plea discloses facts of communication between donald trump campaign and the russians we didn't know about
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and that could be a bigger problem for trump. more details have emerged about alleged russian attempts to influence voters on social media. facebook believes that 126 million american users may have come into co nta ct with russian backed propaganda during the election. this investigation is not going away, as the white house had hoped, and could overshadow the trump presidency for some time to come. stormont parties have been given another day to resolve the 10—month deadlock over the restoration of power—sharing. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, said the democratic unionists and sinn fein had made progress, but added that they'd made additional requests which needed to be considered by the government. first responders to the terrorist attacks in london and manchester we re attacks in london and manchester were honoured at the pride of britain awards. built awards at the grosvenor hotel were attended by the
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prime minister. residents and community leaders and helpers were given a special recognition award of their work following the grenfell tower fire. prince william their work following the grenfell towerfire. prince william praised the inspiring efforts of those who reacted to the tragedy. amazing stories always, aren't there? it isa stories always, aren't there? it is a terrific occasion. the firefighters are very modest in the work they do. it's nice when they do get public recognition to some of their work. we've been hearing this morning about the bank of england's prediction that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in financial services following britain's departure from the european union. 0ur economics editor kamal ahmed joins us now from our london newsroom. that's all that the numbers, how significant is that 75,000? that's all that the numbers, how significant is that 75,0007m that's all that the numbers, how significant is that 75,000? it has to be seen in context. there are over a million people are employed
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in financial services. it's area where we do have world leading status. that is a relatively small percentage but i think the concern of the banks is about the direction of the banks is about the direction of travel. this number comes as it tells financial institutions, banks, hedge funds is to prepare for the possibility of no deal. i don't think the bank believes that is therefore what will happen but it could be in many people's words, the worst case scenario. could be in many people's words, the worst case scenario. the banks and institutions came back to the bank of england which regulates all financial firms across britain and has given them what are called contingency plans. what would happen if there is that no deal? that is where this 7/ 75,000 figure comes from. london is a globalfinancial centre. it is in no way suggesting that somehow we would lose that status. but what is important is
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that if we do leave the european union without remaining in any form of single market or free trade relationship in financial services, it would certainly put hurdles for london in terms of trading inside the european union. these are the type of banks, they are not like the retailer high street banks. they support big businesses, and government in raising finance. that could be seen as a bit of a headwind if we leave without that deal. predictions have been wrong before. what are they be saying to people whose support brexit. is this another part of project fear? that is not reasonable. people in the bank are not working as if they will be no deal. london outside the european union will still flourish. we area european union will still flourish. we are a global financial centre
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alongside new york, singapore, hong kong. 0utside alongside new york, singapore, hong kong. outside the single market, lots of people think britain could do more work with territories in america, with india, with china. not constrained by european rules. britain does do a huge amount of financial trade with the european union. we have a trade surplus. if there are hurdles, there will be some negative effects. it is not all doom and gloom but i think it is that the —— it is clear the bank of england realises that there is some -- if england realises that there is some —— if there is no deal, there could be negative consequences. the direction of travel. many banks are saying they could move thousands of jobs but what is the reality? saying they could move thousands of jobs but what is the reality7m saying they could move thousands of jobs but what is the reality? if you look at places like frankfurt and paris, those kind of cities do have
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some financial services but louise, nothing like the uk because it's not just the banks that we know like hsbc, berkeley ‘s, is all the legal firms and professional services, the a ccou nta nts firms and professional services, the accountants that support those banks. these are very developed ecologies, very developed markets. you can't transpose that to other cities so i'm sure there will be some movement to paris, some have said they are already planning for limited movement, there will not be a wholesale move because london is really the only global financial centre in europe and this is one of the occasions where europe, the european union, the rest of the union, genuinely does need london to keep a close relationship with europe because of all that support london gives to european companies and to european governments. good to talk to you, thank you so much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the main stories this morning... the bank of england is predicting tens of thousands of cityjob losses if no post—brexit trade deal is agreed with the eu. tighter restrictions are to be placed on fixed odds betting machines as the government considers whether to withdrew —— whether to reduce the maximum stake. have you had a chance to see what is going on with carols weather? it has gone a little bit scooby doo. what is going on? scooby doo?! good morning to you both. it is halloween so morning to you both. it is halloween so we're having some fun here in the weather centre. the forecasters are one but nowhere near as cold as it was this time yesterday. and parts of scotla nd was this time yesterday. and parts of scotland the temperature is actually 15 degrees higher. this morning we also have some brains are the heaviest rain today will be across the west highlands, with lighter and patchy rain pushing
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eastwards into eastern scotland. we will see showers crossing northern ireland and a lot of cloud here this morning as is across northern england. again, nowhere near as cold as it was this time yesterday. for wales and for the rest of england, we are looking a dry start. again, there have been some breaks in the cloud overnight. the temperature in the moment overnight it in exeter is two celsius so you do have a chilly start. through that day it will be breezy, especially in the north. we hang on to the rain and there are a few showers across from northern ireland. we could see a couple in wales. there are showers so they will be the exception rather than the rule. you can see cloud break—up and sunny spells develop. in the sunshine you can see highs of 14 or 15 celsius today. around the london area in the shelter of the pennines in north—east england and through north—east scotland. as we head on through this evening and overnight, this evening if you are going out trick—or—treating it will be mild for most, cloudy and it will still
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have the rain in the north. the rain is still have the across the west highlands and also down in view. for the south, there will be some breaks in the cloud and some mist and fog patches forming here and there. we do not expected to be a widespread issue. as we go into tomorrow we start off on a cloudy no. still with the rain across northern ireland and scotland. will be a wet rush hour and as we go through the day that band of rain will narrow across scotla nd band of rain will narrow across scotland and break—up across northern ireland allowing sunshine and showers to follow one behind. still windy in the north. south of that band of rain, england and wales will brighten up quite nicely with lengthy sunny spells and, again, mostly dry. the temperature tomorrow 14, 15 and the mostly dry. the temperature tomorrow 14,15 and the same as we head into northern england, northern ireland and scotland 12— 14. as we head into wednesday the weather front will continue to sing southwards. it is a wea k feature. continue to sing southwards. it is a
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weak feature. what it will do is bring more cloud across england and wales. you can see a nicely here in the chart. a couple showers ahead of it, still brighter and behind it it will be dry and bright to the next couple of days that the temperature now is starting to slip and was we head into the weekend it will turn colder and showery for most of us. carroll, we will be back to you later on. fixed odds betting terminals, which let punters stake up to £100 every twenty seconds, have been dubbed the ‘crack cocaine of gambling'. now the government has announced plans to bring in tighter controls — with a limit on the amount gamblers can bet on these kind of machines. bookmakers are expected to lobby against the move. but it's something our next guest john meyer has long campaigned for. you've been calling for action because of a very personal reason, tell us about your son? this is such a personal story for you, thank you for coming to talk to us. you, thank you for coming to talk to us. you lost your son. can you tell us us. you lost your son. can you tell us his story. what happened to him? he was a normal lad. very
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self—effacing, could laugh at himself. i get angry at people but he could always laugh and joke. he had a job, he was a carpenter. he loved hisjob had a job, he was a carpenter. he loved his job and was had a job, he was a carpenter. he loved hisjob and was proud of it. a very good carpenter. always showing me photos of things he had done. he played golf at one time when he was younger and he had a handicap of three. he played for his local golf clu b three. he played for his local golf club and was the junior caption. he played darts, he played pool, just a young man. new paint a picture, it sounds like most people know people like that. members of the family. that something else was going on in his life. in the background, what we did not know and people don't understand this, we really did not know what was going on with him but he had gotten into gambling and started to go online and using fixed
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odd betting shops, betting on football and the suchlike. nobody knew anything about it. we went on holiday to turkey, we had a good holiday. he kept us going was a good laugh and joke and stuff like that. we came home on the early hours of friday morning, we went home and my wife found him the following day in a good mood. getting ready for work and everything. and on sunday we tried to get in touch with him and we could not. we got some people who lived close by to go around and the phone rang and it was his number. a toddler was all right and it was somebody telling us to get down there as soon as somebody telling us to get down there as soon as we somebody telling us to get down there as soon as we could. and when we got there, the police was there, the ambulance was there, the road was blocked off. i stopped the car
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andi was blocked off. i stopped the car and i ran to the house. i was told he had self harmed and, my wife wa nted he had self harmed and, my wife wanted to go upstairs and he said, no, sorry. i am so sorry. and you have no idea. what has turned out he had a problem with gambling and had gotten himself into serious issues and had been trying to find a way out. he had been trying to find a way out. people he had been speaking to online, he was talking to an online gambler for a while and he was trying to get out of it. we got onto his facebook and we started reading the stories he had told a sometimes. he had been saying things about how he hadn't had that for days was watching idiots through the window at the gambling betting shop. he was trying his best to get out of
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it. keven held you in yourfamily through it all. what do you make of the notion of the government bringing down the sums, the lump sums you can bet at any one time. what do you make of it? we need to get it down. especially fixed odd betting machines because you just sit there putting money in their. you can lose thousands and thousands. we wanted to get down to it now and pound but now i begin to think that maybe £25 because the gambling people now are starting to be more responsible and talking about helping people. and then you think to yourself... we are speaking to the association of british bookmakers a little later. if you had been, if it had been maximum bet of £2, it is difficult to say but would that have made a difference, do you think? i don't know. the
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thing is that this is a start. this is just thing is that this is a start. this isjust a thing is that this is a start. this is just a start because there are a lot of other things. the thing is, i a lwa ys lot of other things. the thing is, i always say, it is a silent thing, gambling. you can do it without people noticing. the guy who pops around the corner on the phone, nice and quiet, not bothering anybody. is gambling his life away nobody knows. do you what i mean? when these companies say to people £10 and we will give you £40 three, what they do not say is that to get any winnings from your £40 you sometimes have to pay in 100 times the amount of your original stake. and that is before you get any winners back. is that a form of grooming people so they can have a few pleasant it is that at the end they have nothing less. but they remember the win they had before so they get back into a. we will be speaking to the association of dish bookmakers later
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that one thing they constantly say is that they are legitimate marketplace. betting is legal and responsibility lies with them to a degree but also with the individuals who do bet. how do you, knowing what you know, draw those lines between what they're responsible for, what they present, what they advertise and the responsibility of the individual? if any other company advertised the sort of things that they did would not be allowed. would not be allowed for them to say things i buy one get for free but we will make you purchase a more things. they are allowed to get away with this. they emphasise self—help for gambling addicts it is like giving a child to a sweet shop —— keys to a sweet shop in saying
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burger when they. they are not going to do it. we need to look at a lot of things and identify people. i wa nt to of things and identify people. i want to know why, when you go from credit card, you get all sorts of checks to make sure that you can accept that credit card and yet you can flit from site to site to site to site and not be able have a background check to see if you are able to pay. none of them do it. you have made your point quite well and we will put those points to the association temp asked a. thank you very much for talking to a specifically about your time. may i say one more thing? anybody out there with a gambling problem, please talk to somebody. do not keep it to yourself to make sure you do talk to someone. and we can make certain that details of those agencies that help are on the website as well. amidst —— it is 25 minutes past seven if you would like to get in touch with us about that, please do. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. ambulance crews and police officers
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will routinely be dispatched to patients in cardiac arrest in a bid to boost survival rates across the capital. in london, the average cardiac survival rate is 9%. at heathrow, the rate is 75% it was there so many defibrillators available, and stuffy know how to use them. doctors say is the patient gets access to a different later quickly the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest increases significantly. and arrest increases significantly. and a crease in international visitors shows that the economy of london remains strong according to one of the city's leading think tanks. however, the centre for london warns that a stagnant property market and a drop in migration from eastern europe suggest continuing uncertainty following the vote to leave the eu. sugary drinks and swedes should be left out of lunchtime meal deals according to researchers from london. action on sugar, based at queen mary
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university, says that some promotions are packed with as many as 30 teaspoons of sugar, four times the recommended daily intake for adults. the luton based airline, easyjet, has told a commons committee it has no contingency plan for brexit. it follows news the airline has agreed to take over failed carrier air berlin. the deal worth around £35 million includes landing slots and plane leases. last night, the uk director of easyjet told the transport select a good service on the tube at the moment as you can see that. the m4 is now blocked out of town — a car caught fire just afterjunction 2 brentford. da 23 in brixton is closed southbound for repairs to a gas leak. good morning. a grey and cloudy start this morning but it is feeling less cold than it did this time yesterday. the cloud eventually should start to thin and we will see some brighter spells. the breeze is slightly stronger than yesterday. still fairly light, however, coming from the south—west it has
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introduced milder air so it will not feel as chilly. bright spells this afternoon and temperatures reaching 14. 0vernight tonight the cloud will start to disappear so we will get some clear spells. that could lead to one or two mist patches developing by dawn as the wind remains light. reasonably mild, the minimum temperature somewhere between eight and 10 celsius. for wednesday it looks like a brighter day with more sunshine. in fact it feels quite pleasant. the breeze is gentle and coming from the south and in the sunshine could feel quite warm. temperatures reaching 14, possibly 15 celsius. for thursday, this cold front will gradually start to sink south and that will introduce some more cloud. a great day as we head through thursday. it should in most parts stay dry. you should get a spot or two of rain. as we head into the weekend, things will turn a little more uncertain, particularly
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overnight friday into saturday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the bank of england has predicted that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. it's warned firms to prepare to lose their right to trade across the eu although senior figures at the bank say they're optimistic of a deal. around 1 million people currently work in the finance sector across the uk. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has confirmed he was once rebuked by a political journalist for putting his hand on her knee during dinner at a party conference in 2002. the radio presenter, julia hartley brewer, said she did not consider herself to be a victim of sexual harassment
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by mr fallon, but urged others who felt they had been assaulted to come forward. the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals is to be reduced from £100 to between £50 and £2, the government has announced. following a review of the fixed odds betting terminals which critics say are highly addictive, the government said the cut was among a number of options. campaigners are calling for the maximum bet to be reduced tojust £2. but bookmakers say that would lead to half of all betting shops closing. the former leader of catalonia has fled spain to belgium after he was told he could face up to 30 years in prison. spain's state prosecutor said carles puigdemont should face charges of rebellion over his attempts to lead the region to independence. 0ur reporterjoins as from madrid.
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this time yesterday, we're what might happen but what has happened this morning? we are waiting to hear from ca rles this morning? we are waiting to hear from carles puigdemont to find out what he plans on doing in belgium because he has hired a well—known lawyer for because he has hired a well—known lawyerfor immigration because he has hired a well—known lawyer for immigration cases, particularly involving extradition to spain to the question is whether ca rles to spain to the question is whether carles puigdemont might be looking to claim asylum in belgium which is the one country where he would be able to do that in the eu. the lawyers say there is no decision on that but there has been a lot of speculation in spain that that is what is planning to do and reaction that he has left the country at all. i spoke to a senior member of the governing party here and he said that was an act of desperation and proof that the independence bid had failed. a fairly derisive response to ca rles failed. a fairly derisive response to carles puigdemont leaving but until he speaks, we don't know what he is doing in belgium. he is expected to speak a little later on
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today to clarify. carol will be here with the weather in a few minutes. she has a special forecast today. a halloween eve feel. a dancing skeleton. what have you got us? the story of someone what have you got us? the story of someone coming home. mo farah, he is coming home. he spent the summer here after the championships. a reminder of home. he has been in the states, the hugely successful period to him. he won ten global titles. i think fills target time come home. he wants his family to grow up in the uk. it brings to an end his six year relationship with his coach alberto salazar, who remains under investigation by the us anti doping agency, after allegations of drug use at his training base. he denies any wrong doing and farah says he's never had any reason to doubt him.
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he's posted a short message on social media. i want to thank each member of the project and alberto for all he's done over the years. i am coming back and my new coach will be gavin locke so i'm excited to start a new project, and i can't wait to be back home and see my team at arsenal at the emirates. the real reason he is coming back is for arsenal. he's been linked with everton but sean dyche says he's just concentrating on his currentjob — and it's working. burnley are up to 7th in the premier league after beating newcastle one nil, jeff hendrick with the goal, as their manager marked five years in charge. we stayed focused on the next game. it's a way that i found works with the team and is appropriate because the next game is the most important game. we never take anything for granted, it's a tough division.
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it's a sprint, we made a good start. watford captain troy deeney has been charged with violent conduct after he appeared to grab stoke's joe allen by the face towards the end of their match on saturday. the ship with the under 20's winning their wrold cup and the under 19s —— with the under 20's winning their wrold cup becoming european champions, it's been a hugely successful year. but what does it mean for the future of the england national side? the england team is the purest youth development. you can't sign a form player to get in the way. so that's so important overall here at george's park. they're all mixing, you can move them between teams. southgate isn'tjust sat with the first team, he can look at all the teams and look at getting progress reports from all the coaches and it will be a point of oh, yeah, this one is good enough. they will be looking to break in
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their respective premier league clu bs. it's a big night ahead in the champions league, with manchester united, chelsea and celtic all in action. lots of build—up on the bbc sport website. tiger woods has announced his return to competition. 0nly last month, he said he might never play again after four operations on his black that he will tee up at the hero world challenge he is hosting in the bahamas at the end of november. former world snooker champion stuart bingham has decided not to appeal against his six month ban for breaching betting rules. the ban was suspended for 3 months and a day, which means he'll return to the game after the masters next year. and there was a big surprise for ronnie 0'sullivan at snooker‘s international open in china and not just from his opponent's suit. he was beaten by yan bingtao, who's only 17 but already has a certain sartorial style and one of the stars of the future perhaps? 0'sullivan said only two other players —
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john higgins and stephen hendry — had played that well against him. he is destined for big things. aren't there snooker rules on outfits? clearly not. would that have passed? last week we were talking about him having to wear black trainers because there were rules about the trainers. you are meant to look smart. trainers doesn't really cut it. that is the issue. he had a bad ankle. allegations of cheating in paralympic sport will be examined by a parliamentary committee this morning. mps will discuss the classification of athletes after a bbc investigation uncovered claims of tactics being used to cheat the system, taping up of arms and even surgery to shortened limbs. baroness tanya graham thompson is among the people expected to give evidence to the enquiry. sports reporter kate gray willjoin us in a
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moment. we will speak to her second. the london 2017 world power outlet championships were britain's most successful to date, winning a total of 18 gold is one of which went to 0livia brean in the long jump. 12 months earlier, herfather 0livia brean in the long jump. 12 months earlier, her father was trying to persuade the sport altogether. after rio 2016, we tried ha rd to altogether. after rio 2016, we tried hard to persuade our daughter to give up disability sport. the thing that she loves and the thing we encouraged her to pick up. but because we felt there was no integrity in the sport in terms of what the classification process is, we knew it was damaging her and other athletes psychologically to compete against people who all new they shouldn't be in the class because they didn't have the same empowerment. these are not new concerns. hannah cockroft has dominated the t 34 category since london 2012. i know i've had a lot
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of accusations thrown against myself but that is because my class is a lwa ys but that is because my class is always described as a cerebral palsy class and i don't have cerebral palsy. that is my lazy analysis of what the classification is. you can't can care what —— you can't compare one disability to another. classification was developed by the committee who have rejected the invite to attend today's parliamentary meeting but a few days ago they did announce that as of january 2018 they will be reviewing the classification and regulations for athletics. those with learning difficulties in the tea and a 20 category and those with cerebral palsy or brain injuries who compete in thet palsy or brain injuries who compete in the t and f 30 categories will have categorisation reviewed. also plans to re— categorise all on a limb and beauty is known as blade runner soup compete in the t 40 categories. robert has been coaching
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paralympic athletes row over a decade and appreciates it is a complicated systems which needs to be regulated. medical advances are amazing and new things are happening all the time. it's important the classic case rules to take that into account. —— classification. will they change it every single year, no, but they should look at it every year so that things stay consistent. there is no straightforward solution but it's clear that things to change so but it's clear that things to change so the integrity in future paralympic sport is safe. kate gray is with us now. you've been through the testing process. what changes need to be made? classification has been causing a lot of unrest in the system. the issue is, the sport got so big, there are more athletes competing,
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more disability is included and medical advances like the casa fakes —— the classification system is out of date. as a result, a lot of unhappy people out there. at this stage, we have heard from the international paralympic committee in response to michael breen, who we heard from. explaining they have taken into heard from. explaining they have ta ken into account heard from. explaining they have taken into account his complaints, they have gone to all the right medical processes and from that point of view, the key is to think about the well— being of point of view, the key is to think about the well—being of the athletes. they remain deeply concerned about the well— being of athletes and those who have been caught in the crossfire. those who have been accused and have these allegations against them. and they are unable to make the committee today due to prior commitments but they have submitted a 9— page written evidence which will be published on the website on tuesday morning? those in the sport is well say this is complicated. which
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athletes are going to be affected by the changes. we know those are going to be taken part in hearings. also, head of the british paralympic association, the former had closed shut of british athletics, they will all be giving evidence with a wide perspective what has been taking place. it's difficult to actually know what is going to be said, whether they are going to name names precisely the international paralympic committee precisely the international pa ralympic committee have precisely the international paralympic committee have reacted to this. they have already started to make changes to the rules and regulations of the classification system. the likes of hannah cockroft and others, all those who compete in the t 30 categories, will have their classification reviewed next year with a chance they could move up or down the categories. they could also affect key 20 but also the blade
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runners will be categorised differently. very complicated. i don't know how much you can say. if you are paralympic athlete, it is worrying. it is, because the integrity of the sport is kind of up against it at the moment and they need to find a fair playing field that everybody feels part of. we know that not every athlete is going to be happy with the new changes. we've heard from athletes like richard whitehead who says there will be less competition because they are dividing up the categories too much. it could put them off competing. a difficult topic. it will be interesting to see how it unfolds. thank you very much. this is breakfast. the main stories. the bank of england is predicting tens of thousands of cityjob losses if no post—brexit trade deal is agreed with the eu. tighter restrictions are to be placed on fixed—odds betting machines as the government considers
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whether to reduce the maximum sta ke. is it isita is it a halloween elton? i think it is more like a martial art skeleton. it can be both, konta carol? he is very happy to be here this morning. this morning it is a far milder start to the day then was yesterday. in some parts, 10 degrees higher than yesterday, in others, 15. across southern areas where we have brea ks across southern areas where we have breaks in the cloud overnight it is a chilly start to beat the forecast todayis a chilly start to beat the forecast today is a breezy one across many areas. we have rain, particularly heavy across western scotland, patchy as it moves across the west of scotland. —— rest of scotland think will see a few patches of rain in wales and the midlands to be given into the afternoon we have a combination. generally across the south will be dry today. some sunny
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spells will develop. the same for wales. you will hang on to some cloud through the course of the day, thick enough not shower with bright breaks. here are the showers across northern england and showers across northern ireland. they are showers. so many of us will mist them all together. into scotland, the rain continues, persistently across the island to moving away from that in the rain is patchy. across the east of scotla nd the rain is patchy. across the east of scotland in the shelter of the gambit —— grampians or the pennines it could hit 14 or 15 degrees, quite good for this time of year. if you are going at trick—or—treating, it should stay dry for most. will be cloudy and mild but we will hang on to the rain across scotland and northern ireland. through the course of the night, that will turn heavier it moves south. we shall tomorrow morning across scotland and northern ireland that you will also find the weather front producing the rain as
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it sinks south and it will weaken and the band of rain will be much narrower and start to break up across northern ireland. that allows fresh conditions and sunshine and showers coming in across the west of scotland. —— rest of scotland. after a relatively cloudy start you will see the cloud break and some sunshine coming through. about 15 celsius, 14, 13 and 12 as we push across the rest of the uk. here we have the weather front coming southwards. that will continue to wea ken southwards. that will continue to weaken as it does during the course of thursday and it will be much more than a band of cloud with the odd spot of rain on it. south of that, bright skies and sunshine. to the north, particularly across western scotla nd north, particularly across western scotland it will be much drier and brighter. but note the temperatures. they are coming down from the north. we are looking at ninth and 10th across the far north and even in the south, they come down as well. here
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values will be just a little higher to thank you, carol. we've been talking about the impact of brexit on the financial industry this morning, but leaving the eu is also likely to have a significant effect on all aspects of our food chain too. steph is at a pig farm in east yorkshire for us this morning to tell us more: is the kind that those pigs woke up? good morning to you both. they are slowly waking up. some of the pigs are already going for a feed. you may be able to hear the men the background to think they have sensors on areas that can tell the machine that feeds them which big it is so they know exactly what feed or nutrients to give them. something like 47,000 pigs born on this farm every year and it is obviously really important for them, what is happening with the uk leaving the european union because it is the eu that dictates all of the rules around it and has to do with the
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trade across industry as well. we still do not produce enough pork in terms of what we eat in the uk so we still import an awful lot of pork into the uk. i went to denmark, the biggest provider of pork meat in the uk, to find out what difference leaving the eu may make. denmark. famous for pastries, lego, butter, beer and bacon. this country has done well with trading with the uk, in particular, selling us pork. 0ne quarter of the pork products we import into the uk come from denmark and they have been exporting it for over 150 years. this farmer is the fifth generation in his family to run this business. 35,000 pigs are born on this farm every year. 0n ourfarm we produce especially for the uk market. most of our production end up in the uk. it is an important thing.
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are you worried about it? we are following what is happening at the moment and we will be trying to find new markets for our product but we hope we can keep treating it as we have done for hundreds of years. as we leave the farm we travel along miles of flat green land. it is unsurprising that agriculture is big business here. this factory is the world ‘s largest exporter of pork. at the moment they do not have to pay tariffs when trading with us. that could change when we leave. the only thing we know is uncertainty. and as a business we don't like uncertainty. there is a need for imports to the uk and we also think the affinity between us especially with food will prevail. we need the uk and we think the uk needs us as well. here they are cutting up pork loin
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that will be shipped to the uk within the next few days, cured and made into back bacon. for the last 40 years, anything to do with food has been controlled by the eu. from subsidies to safety. here on the west coast, some of the goods leaving here are heading across the north sea to the uk. food is put on lorries here in denmark and will arrive a distribution centres in the uk without facing border checks. even small delays in time can have an effect on some ports regarding trucks. we are sure if we get administrative burdens we will be able to sort some of them out with technology but some of our concerns is what will happen in the uk. will your economy slow down? will the buying power for the british people slowdown? they are optimistic that trade with the uk will continue
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after we leave the eu. but it is clear that they are hoping it will be with a deal that does not change much in what we already have. that is the view from denmark. how about pork producers here? are chatting out to vicki, one of the people who runs this farm. thank you for letting us in. tell us about your thoughts on brexit. you think there are opportunities for you? definitely. the common agricultural policy will be reformed and hopefully there may be a bit more focus on systems of production so that help in improving our efficiency and our productivity, higher welfare systems, hopefully and just more focus on innovation and just more focus on innovation and making us better than what we already were. how is business for you at the moment? business lately has been good since the brexit vote.
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the vote, the devaluation of the pound has made that useful. so you are optimistic at the moment? yes. there is a risk that if we do not get a deal with europe that we will be left uncompetitive. we cannot afford to not get a deal with europe. that will allow imports from other parts of the world such as brazil and america who do not have the same welfare standards that nor the same welfare standards that nor the same welfare standards that nor the same production systems. and environmental systems that we have in place to that will make us uncompetitive. so i will let you carry on doing what you do. because i know some of them want food more than anything and i am holding them back from it. jetting out to tim. we heard there about the agricultural problems and side of things. what about food and drink in general? we are waiting to find out if we get the eu trade deal spoken about. 70%
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of food and drink from the uk goes to europe. it is our biggest market. she is also right that there is some opportunity here for businesses like this that are all about quality, to export more, to sell more domestically. there are great opportunities to turbocharge our exports and that is one of the things we are talking to government about. we heard there are obviously that vicki is doing quite well after the drop in the value of pounds. that is greater producers but not so good for shop prices. consumers have seen good for shop prices. consumers have seen food prices increase a look at over the last year or so. we think that will steady a full beard but the thing that is driving trouble at the thing that is driving trouble at the moment is uncertainty. we don't know what we will have... we don't know what we will have... we don't know what we will have... we don't know what the trade deal will look like nor the transition deal. we are pressing the government to give a sensors to those things because in the absence of bad, the likelihood is we will continue to seek prices to rise and more uncertainty for consumers. “— to rise and more uncertainty for consumers. —— in the absence of that. let me show you hear the
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feeding system. you can hear them complaining because they have to queue for the food. they can only squeeze through one or two at a time. just like the bbc canteen in a morning after brexit —— breakfast finishes, there is a queue and we get cranky with each other. i will show you more of the farm a little later. you need a few sharp elbows there. it is surprisingly quiet down there. it is surprisingly quiet down there. this morning we thought it would be much noisier but it is clearly because they are waiting. very patiently waiting. be able to find out more about issues regarding food production in a post brexit britain. you could see that carol's forecast was dominated by ghosts this morning. it used to be all about trick—or—treating, carving pumpkins and apple bobbing, but it seems halloween has now gone glam. vanessa davis is hard at work at the moment. she's a makeup artist who fronts youtube tutorials.
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you will be busy today. thank you for coming in. it looks so glamorous and not necessarily scary. halloween does not need to be scary. that is correct. we will see what happens as that progresses. i am no expert but there is construction is on the side to guess, contouring is well.l little bit of conferring on the cheeks. are not an expert either... more on that later. if you have photos, please send them in. they don't have to be as good as this, either to time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. from this week, met police officers
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carrying life saving equipment will treat patients in cardiac arrest until paramedics arrive in a bid to save thousands of lives to after a successful trial, despatching both emergency services will become routine. an increase in international visitors shows that the economy of london remains strong according to one of the city's leading think tanks. however, the centre for london warns that a stagnant property market and a drop in migration from eastern europe suggest continuing uncertainty following the vote to leave the eu. sugary drinks and sweets should be left out of lunchtime meal deals according to researchers from london. action on sugar, based at queen mary university, says that some promotions are packed with as many as 30 teaspoons of sugar, four times the recommended daily intake for adults. a good service on the tube
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at the moment as you can see that. borough at the moment as you can see that. station on the is borough station on the northern line is closed because of problems with the list. there were delays of up to 15 minutes at paddington because of signalling problems. there is currently no service on the heathrow connect. this is the 823 brixton rd. still closed southbound between 0val and brixton for repairs to a gas leak. eversholt street next to euston station is still closed for reparirs to the water main that burst last week. and finally in mill hill, the a1 is slower than usual after a van broke down. good morning. a grey and cloudy start this morning but it is feeling less cold than it did this time yesterday. the cloud eventually should start to thin and we will see some brighter spells. the breeze is slightly stronger than yesterday.
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still fairly light, however, coming from the south—west it has introduced milder air so it will not feel as chilly. bright spells this afternoon and temperatures reaching 14. 0vernight tonight the cloud will start to disappear so we will get some clear spells. that could lead to one or two mist patches developing by dawn as the wind remains light. reasonably mild, the minimum temperature somewhere between eight and 10 celsius. for wednesday it looks like a brighter day with more sunshine. in fact it feels quite pleasant. the breeze is gentle and coming from the south and in the sunshine could feel quite warm. temperatures reaching 14, possibly 15 celsius. for thursday, this cold front will gradually start to sink south and that will introduce some more cloud. a grey day as we head through thursday. it should in most parts stay dry. you should get a spot or two of rain. as we head into the weekend, things will turn a little more uncertain, particularly overnight friday into
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saturday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. a crackdown on high stakes betting machines. the government considers new limits on the amount that can be gambled. a review of fixed odds terminals has been announced. it could see the maximum stake fall to as little as £2. good morning, it's
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tuesday, 31st october. also this morning... a brexit warning from the bank of england. it's predicting as many as 75,000 financial services jobs could be lost if britain leaves the eu without a new trade deal. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, says he apologised to a journalist after putting his hand on her knee when they had dinner together. facebook reveals that more than 100 million americans may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, around the time of the us election. good morning from this pig farm in east yorkshire, were today i am looking at what impact brexit will have on agriculture. in sport, mo heads home — after six years based in the united states, farah, the four time 0lympic champion, says he's missing london and wants his children to grow up in the uk. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. it is halloween today. if you are stepping out of this evening, the forecast is a cloudy but mild one with rain in the north. a cloudy and mild start for most today. there is some rain, the heaviest in western scotland. it will brighten in the south. good morning. first, our main story. the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals is to be reduced from £100 to between 50 and two, the government has announced. following a review of the machines — which critics say are highly addictive — ministers said the cut was among a number of options being considered. bookmakers say a reduction to the lowest proposed level would lead to the closure of half of all betting shops. jim connolly has more. a few months ago, nathan would have struggled to walk past a bookmakers. his excessive gambling problem started with fixed odds machines. he stopped betting with help from gamblers anonymous.
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i found myself suddenly with debts i could not cover. i lost about £5,000 in 48 hours. you lose all sense of time around you. the money is just a number on a screen. you're desensitised to everything that is going on. gamblers anonymous was my final resort to save relationships. you can bet up to £100 a time on a fixed odds terminal. the government review suggests a much lower limit, making these machines less attractive. last year, £1.8 billion was made from these types of machines. the association of british bookmakers says limiting the amount you bet each time could mean that half of all betting shops would close, and 21,000 people may lose theirjobs. just like high streets, up and down the country, this part of east london has more than its fair share of bookmakers. legally, shops like this one are restricted to having only four machines in each shops.
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some critics say they are so profitable that some companies have multiple branches in the same area. the gambling industry has 12 weeks to respond before the government decides how low its limit will be. earlier we spoke tojohn myers, whose son was a gambling addict and took his own life at the age of 27. john said the proposals don't go far enough. for a gambling addict, it's like giving a child the keys to a sweet shop and saying, don't go in there. they won't do it. they needed to be more responsible. they need to be looking into things and identifying people. i want to know why, when you go for a credit card, you get all kinds of checks to make sure that you can accept that credit card. and yet you can flick from site to site
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and nobody does a background check on you. nobody ever does it. we will get the reaction to the proposals from the association of it as bookmakers. the bank of england has predicted that up to 75,000 jobs could be lost in the uk's financial services sector, if brexit negotiations fail to produce a trade deal with the european union. senior figures at the bank have also warned financial firms to prepare to lose their right to trade across the eu. kamal ahmed reports. it will be one of the toughest challenges facing the brexit negotiators — tackling the multi—trillion pound financial services industry which links the uk with the rest of the european union. banks and financial companies based in britain pay £67 billion in taxes each year, and contribute a trade surplus of £58 billion, helping the uk's economy. many eu countries would like a slice of the sector, and see brexit as an opportunity. frankfurt and paris, for example, are marketing themselves as new places to locate.
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the bank of england is now preparing for tens of thousands ofjob losses, which it believes will hit the uk if there is no new free trade deal. some will simply disappear as the financial sector shrinks across britain, and some will be lost to london's competitor cities. although the bank believes 75,000 job losses is a reasonable scenario over three to five years, many are optimistic that a good deal will be signed on financial services, because both the uk and the eu will not want to disrupt such a vital component of the economy, and even with the job losses, britain, with over one million financial servicesjobs, will still be by far the most important centre for banking in europe. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has confirmed that he apologised to the journalist, julia hartley—brewer, after putting his hand on her knee during a dinner together in 2002. chris masonjoins us now from westminster. chris, this happened some time ago.
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why has this come to light now? good morning. it did happen some time ago, 15 years ago. it has emerged because there is this swirling soup of goss about westminster at the moment in the context of concern about sexual harassment. yes, there is some conflating going on. people gossiping about affairs, about inappropriate behaviour. some making far more serious allegations. and then along comes this particular specific story where we have heard both sides of the argument for the first time as these revelations have emerged. let's look at the front page of the sun newspaper. —— the sun. this involves sir michael fallon. julia hartley brewer, a former politicaljournalist
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fallon. julia hartley brewer, a former political journalist and radio presenter. they were at a dinner at the conservative party conference in 2002. michael fallon put his hand onjulia hartley brewer's me. she made it clear she thought that was inappropriate. he acknowledges that he overstepped the mark. there was a sense from his tea m mark. there was a sense from his team that they felt the sun front—page overcooked things. let's look at a statement from julia hartley brewer. she has posted this on twitter. what is quite striking is thatjulia hartley brewer posted that statement prior to the sun pots revelation naming sir michael fallon. she was keen not to be drawn into a public discussion about what had happened in solving and named individual before the paper decided to publish his name. you talk about these swirling rumours that are going around westminster. they spent a lot of time yesterday, mps, specifically
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talking about what they would do about alleged cases of sexual harassment? yeah. on top of the swirling nature of the conversation here at the moment and these spreadsheets that have been doing the rounds with the latest misdemeanours and redaction blacking through various specifics and details, there is a big conversation going on here about how westminster response to sexual harassment. what procedures are in place. two things are striking. 0ne procedures are in place. two things are striking. one is the weird culture of westminster around working practices. here you have an institution were 650 people, go to work every week, many of them away from home, working late at night, where alcohol is involved, were lots of mps and people in of —— power are men, and lots of morejunior staff are women. 0n men, and lots of morejunior staff are women. on top of that there is now then an examination of the
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practices and procedures and rules governing people who want to make complaints. trying to change the system is so you don't have a system, for example, where the aid to an mp wants to complain about alleged sexual harassment and realises the person they have to complain to is the employer, who is the mp themselves, and it may be that mp they want to complain about. there is a real desire to see changes happened pretty quickly, to try to set down a new rule book, if you like, to govern and regulate working practices in what is quite an odd working environment, giving the nature of the errors and the nature of the employment contracts. —— the nature of the hours. thank you. facebook says 126 million americans may have seen content uploaded by fake accounts with links to russia, during the last two years. it comes as president trump's former campaign manager, paul manafort, faces charges as part of an inquiry into allegations that russia interfered with
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the presidential election. from washington, laura bicker reports. paul manafort, donald trump's former campaign manager leaves court under house arrest, facing 12 grave charges, including money laundering and conspiracy. he's pleading not guilty, and the charges don't relate to his work with the trump campaign. but as he sped away from the spotlight, there came an unexpected bombshell. george papadopoulos, an unpaid foreign policy adviser for the trump campaign secretly, pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi about his russian contacts. his charge sheet says that while he was an aide he met a russian professor in london, who said he had dirt on hillary clinton — despite having earlier told the fbi he wasn't a member of the trump campaign when the meeting took place. the professor claimed he had thousands of clinton campaign emails, and he worked to arrange a meeting between vladimir putin and donald trump, something
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that did not happen. papadopoulos‘ guilty plea discloses facts of communication between donald trump campaign and the russians we didn't know about, and that could be a bigger problem for trump. more details have emerged about alleged russian attempts to influence voters on social media. facebook believes that 126 million american users may have come into contact with russian backed propaganda during the election. this investigation is not going away, as the white house had hoped, and could overshadow the trump presidency for some time to come. prince william attended the pride of britain awards last night, in which first responders to the terrorist attacks in london and manchester were among the people honoured. just a warning, the following pictures do contain flashing images. the awards, at london's grosvenor hotel, were also attended by the prime minister. residents and community helpers were given a special recognition award for their work following the grenfell tower fire. prince william praised
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the "inspiring" efforts of those who reacted to the tragedy. back to our top story — fixed odds betting terminals, which let punters stake up to £100 every 20 seconds, have been dubbed the "crack cocaine of gambling". joining us now from our london newsroom is malcolm george, the chief executive of the association of british bookmakers. good morning. you will have heard the recommendations that and know to be looked at. this suggestion that the fixed—odds betting machine should have a lower maximum fee attached to them. the government is looking at between £2 and £50. what is your initial reaction?” looking at between £2 and £50. what is your initial reaction? i think the government has come forward with some intelligent ideas. they share are macro focus on wanting to identify problem gamblers and getting the help they need. i think
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what is interesting is the range you have just mentioned. £2 to £50. they have just mentioned. £2 to £50. they have looked at the evidence submitted last year and they haven't come down with the firm view. the evidence around courting the state doesn't necessarily suggest you are going to help problem gamblers. —— cutting macro. the risk for the industry as a whole is that you simply move a problem gamblerfrom one environment into another, into an amusement arcade, into a casino, into online. that may not be the best policy outcome. i think the range they have suggested tells smack that the hard evidence that there is a simple silver bullet. the government has looked at the evidence and clearly realises that is not the case. the problem with some of your argument is that if you are saying the problem will go elsewhere, if you deal with it in one place, then people who want to bet will find somewhere else. you
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can bet will find somewhere else. you ca n forever bet will find somewhere else. you can forever make that argument for not doing anything. the point is you represent betting shops. it is possible for betting shops to actually do something. so on one of those terminals, betting shops could have a much lower maximum amount of money you can bet at any one time. why not do that, if that might help, notwithstanding that you make the fair point people can go elsewhere? you can still do what you can do. exactly. i think when we look at the government's proposals we will look at the range of stakes. they are talking about measures on machines and spin speeds. what will make betting shops and any gambling environment safer, is a combination of factors that alerts a problem gambler‘s when they start to move into trouble. identifies them. gets contact with them. and then points them in the direction of the support
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they need. if that was simply stake thenit they need. if that was simply stake then it would have happened many yea rs then it would have happened many years ago. it's a complex factors that help us identify who a problem gambler is get them the help that they need. the machines that are in place, you place £100 bet every 20 seconds. now, on the face of it, ta ke seconds. now, on the face of it, take this lower figure of £2. it is currently £100, an enormous drop, the £2, as an industry, are you saying that's simply not do—able, you are using the economic argument the other way, if that were to come in its place, your industry, betting shops, half would close. why is that releva nt shops, half would close. why is that relevant if you're talking about people's welfare. you would just find another way of making money, wouldn't you ? find another way of making money, wouldn't you? if it was proven that that would be a benefit to a problem gambler, of course, we would consider it. but losing 12,000 jobs,
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losing half the betting shop estate, thatis losing half the betting shop estate, that is a very high price for it to pay for a measure that by the government's own admission, because they're asking about such a big range, mightn't work and might simply drive gamblers underground into the hands of moneylenders into more dangerous environments. so what we have to do is look at a balanced set of measures that actually address problem gamble ofblers, just cutting stake to £2, ruining the lives of the thousands of employees who will lose theirjobs. ruining the high street and the attraction betting shops provide. when it won't actually be a benefit of to a problem gambler. that simply doesn't make sense. well, it is interesting. i don't know if you had the opportunity earlier on we spoke to john myers, his son ryan, took his own life because of gambling problems. he gambled in many different ways. when you hear it as a personal story like that, on a
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personal level you would share how awful it is. this is a gambling addiction a young man who took his own life. he made the point to us that your industry and i know you are betting shops, the betting industry needs to be more responsible. he said if you are taking out a credit card you are checked as to whether or not you should be doing this. whether it is responsible to lend to you and his feeling, from his own knowledge and his own personal experience, the gambling industry isn't that interested in doing it, not really. they pay lip service to it, but not in practise. let mejust they pay lip service to it, but not in practise. let me just be clear. you are not use a credit card in a betting shop. of oversight of what people are spending and whether they are spending it responsibly. you look at the controls and checks we have on our machines. unique to our machines. so alerts for how long you played. alerts for how much money you have inserted. interaction with
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staff. the investment we are making in algorisms on machines so we can identify problem gamblers. this isn't an organisation that's playing lip service, and as i understand t actually in the government consultation, they highlight the need for other sectors to actually start adopting the measures we've invested in because we want to identify problem gamblers. we want to get them help. you make the point about the restrictions in place on those machines, but from what you're saying there, i'm sensing that you actually would be comfortable with the £100 maximum remaining? you think that's ok? we believe that if you put sufficient checks, controls and balances in, yes, the £100 is final. remember, these machines were introduced 15 years ago. since that time, the levels of problem gambling in the uk have not risen. the last set of statistics was described by
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the gambling regulator as statistically stable. now as an industry, that's not acceptable. we need to get the numbers down. but the idea that there has been some surge in the number of problem gamblers since these machines were introduced simply isn't the case. what we need to do is we need to identify gamblers. get them help. and the industry will and does fund that assistance. ok, malcolm george, i really appreciate your time this morning from the association of british bookmakers. do get in touch with that about that. carol has the weather. she has a hallowe'en forecast! this morning we have got cloud, it is producing rain. it is not as cold a start to the day for most of us as it was yesterday. so this is the picture. it's a breezy day in the south we have spots of rain. they should fade and the cloud that we
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have will tend to break, and we will see sunshine. as in the north, we have got rain moving across scotland. heavy at the moment. but for south—west england, well, you're infora for south—west england, well, you're in for a pleasant day. the cloud breaking. sunshine coming out and that holds true as we push across southern counties. at worst you will be looking at bright spells meaning there will be cloud around and high cloud and at best sunny skies, but one or two showers across east anglia, the midlands and into north—west england and also through scotla nd north—west england and also through scotland where we have got the rain moving north—east wards into the northern isles and heavier and more persistent rain across argyll and bute. for northern ireland, you are not immune to a shower this afternoon either. temperatures in belfast getting up to 14 celsius. neither are we immune to a shower across wales, but for most of wales, it will be dry. we will have bright spells or sunny spells. if you're out trick or treating, it should be largely dry for england and wales. it will be mild. it will be cloudy
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with one or two breaks further south, but for scotland and northern ireland, we have some rain and it will be breezy. by the end of the night, the rain sinking south. so, across the m8 tomorrow morning, there will be a lot of rain for the rush hour as there will be across northern ireland. but as this rain band sinks southwards, it's going to narrow and turn more patchy. more particularly across northern ireland. behind it, we will see sunshine and showers. still windy in the far north. ahead of it for england and wales, we will start to see the cloud break and sunny spells coming through and temperatures between 12 and 15 celsius. from wednesday into thursday, the weather front producing the narrow band of rain sinks southwards as a weak feature. it will introduce a bit more cloud across southern england and wales. the far south, seeing something brighter at times and behind it, much drier, and brighter thanit behind it, much drier, and brighter than it is going to be today. drier particularly across the west highlands. temperatures coming down
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though. seven to nine in the north and ten to 12 celsius and 14 in the channel islands. even that is a wee bit lower than today. so as we head on into friday, something a little bit more unsettled coming our way. again we have got splashes of rain. 0ne again we have got splashes of rain. one or two showers. some dry weather in between. temperatures well, starting to dip as we head into the weekend. and we'll see some more showers in the forecast as well. but if you're going out trick or treating tonight, have a great time. charlie and lou, are you doing it? not tonight. i have in the past, thank you very much. you're watching breakfast. steph is in yorkshire to investigate the impact leaving the eu could have on our food industry. and you are with some rather wonderful little piglets? good morning. it's breakfast time here
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this morning with these little piglets. there are 47,000 of them born here on this farm in east yorkshire every single year. so you can see the sow, that's the big that had the little piglets over the last couple of days and there is pens full of them. these are the little piglets which haven't woken up. they are undera piglets which haven't woken up. they are under a little heat lamp this morning. i don't know why i'm whispering, they are clearly waking up whispering, they are clearly waking up now from me opening this little lid up! you can see the little piglets there and it is interesting to see all of this because it is a really important food industry as well because, of course, agriculture in the uk is a really important business. so let's have a chat with kate who is here who helps to run this farm. good morning, kate. i'm laughing because we have got our producer crawling on the floor trying to get out of shot! she is like a little piglet. you are hold
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be one of the piglets. tell us about how this process works? we have 17oosows on this farm. every week we pharaoh 72 pigs so they give birth. they have 14 piglets born alive and they will get weaned at 28 days of age. at that point they leave the farm and go on to other farms and then the sow gets put into pig and then the sow gets put into pig and the process starts all over again. for you, it is a family business. tell us about the history. mum and dad started the business 20 years ago and my two sisters and myself are heavily involved as well. and business is going well for you at the moment because of the weaker pound? yes, the weaker pound has really helped because it meant it is more expensive to import meat from the eu. so yeah, retailers are buying british which is brilliant and so consumer really should be buying british too. i'm going to let you put that little piglet back. tim
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is from the food and drinks federation. tim, give us your thought on the wider impact of brexit? there is a cloud of uncertainty over the industry because we don't have answers to things about transition and the trade deal. and what we see here is the brilliant quality of british food. we are ready to take on the world as soon as we get those answers. there is clearly positives and negatives because this farm has done well from the weaker pound. there are other parts that haven't because we import so much. food prices have gone up and that's difficult and we are going to continue to see that while there is uncertainty, we need answers from government. tim, thank you very much for your time this morning. i want to leave you with a shot and where have we got the best little pigs suckling. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. hello, good morning. aftera
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hello, good morning. after a frosty start yesterday, today is looking milder but cloudier. some outbreaks of rain for northern ireland, northern england and scotland. heavy in western scotland. some showers in wales and the midlands. central and southern england will see plenty of dry weather. some sunny spells developing. it will be milder than yesterday. today is halloween. if you are planning to head out tonight, it looks like it will be quite wet for western part of scotland. there is the chance of some rain in the north. the further south you come, more in the way of dry weather. clear spells.
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temperatures not doing too badly. milder than of late. temperatures largely in the double figures at six o'clock this evening as we move into the south—west. this evening and overnight we hold onto that rain in the north—west. some heavy bursts. it is very persistent for western pa rt it is very persistent for western part of scotland. further south, clear spells heading north. temperatures will fall away slightly. slightly milder in the north. that takes us macro into wednesday. —— us. rain will move slowly southwards. it will become cloudierfor northern slowly southwards. it will become cloudier for northern ireland and into southern scotland and the far north of england. behind it, sunny spells and showers. a largely dry and friday day for much of england and friday day for much of england and wales. temperatures at a maximum of 15 degrees. into thursday, the cold front moves southwards. a change in fortunes as we move into thursday. a chilly start in the
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north, a cloudy day in the south with patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle. this is business live from bbc news, with sally bundock and ben bland. facebook says nearly half of all americans might have seen divisive russia linked posts ahead of last year's presidential election. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 31st october. the tech giant is due to tell politicians in washington about russia's impact on the poll, amid fears that it will face tighter regulation, along with twitter and google. also in the programme.... the bank of england warns that brexit could mean tens of thousands of financial services jobs are lost in the city of london.
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